Discriminatory Processing will teach you how to take in different bits of information and recognize what is important and what you can filter.

In Discriminatory Processing Beginner, the student is given a first person point of view perspective of a spaceship cockpit.  Beyond the dashboard a field of stars is clearly visible.  As has been true of all Play Attention games, the student must focus to start the exercise.  If the student is distracted or daydreaming, they will hear an audio prompt that says, Focus to refuel.

Once the student is mentally attentive, the spaceship begins its journey through the galaxy.  On the way, two types of asteroids will come at the ship; white ones and red ones, (in effect presenting two types of stimuli to discriminate between). The white asteroids can damage the ship, so the student must hit the keyboard space bar anytime a white asteroid approaches.  This will raise the ship's shields and protect it from taking damage.  Timing is important here, because if the space bar is hit too early, the shields will go back down before the asteroid makes contact.  If the space bar is hit too late, the ship takes damage.

The second type of asteroid, the red type, is actually made of energy that the ship can absorb.  As such, the student should simply let the red asteroids come aboard.  So, press the space bar for the white; do nothing for the red. And again, if the student becomes distracted or starts day dreaming, the ship will stop moving and they will hear, Focus to refuel.

Discriminatory Processing Intermediate is identical to Discriminatory Processing Beginner, except that now other space ships will fly past in an attempt to distract the student. No action needs to be taken for these other ships. Starflyer Intermediate also has a more populated galaxy.  While Beginner simply has a field of stars, Intermediate boasts planets and moons as well.

Discriminatory Processing Advanced is identical to Discriminatory Processing Intermediate, except that the asteroids and distractions come faster, and sometimes in quick succession.