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Inattentiveness and Academic Performance

080825 F 3524M 006 300x198We recently posted about the correlation between Self-image and Academic Performance. And, interestingly, other studies also suggest that there is “a significant and replicated link between parent reports of inattention in their primary school children and future academic achievement, approximately 10 years later.” This, of course, compounds the issues tied to self worth because as inattention drags a student’s academic performance down, that poor performance impacts their self-image which then continues the cycle by impacting the student socially and academically. This appears to be a self perpetuating loop.

Astri Lundervold, a researcher at the University of Bergen, states “Parents of primary school children showing signs of inattention should bergen norway 300x146ask for help for the child. Remedial strategies and training programs for these children should be available at school, and not just for children with a specific diagnosis.”

In the study, negative consequences associated with inattention were not restricted to children within the diagnostic category of ADHD. The negative consequences followed those students whose parents reported inattention at an early age, regardless of diagnosis. Even when factoring in intellectual function, childhood inattention remained an important predictor of later academic performance.

Play Attention, in conjunction with a supportive, nurturing parent/teacher, is just such a remediation strategy! In fact, Tufts Medical School engaged in a study with 41 students and found, of those students using Play Attention, primary parents reported significant change on all three Conners Rating Scales and the two Behavior Assessment Scales for Children. Also, parents reported changes on the Inattention scale and the ADHD Index. Furthermore, the Play Attention group displayed a trend toward lower levels of observed off-task behaviors. None of the other groups involved in the study displayed this change.

Play Attention games have been here for decades supporting students and parents, and can disrupt the negative loop of Inattentiveness.