Memoirs of an ADHD Mom

Love 300x200Every Sunday we post, Memoirs of an ADHD Mom, on our Facebook page. Be certain to read weekly, as Kate shares her real life stories as a mom with ADHD. This week - Love is in the air!

It is easy for all of us to complain about our issues, to talk about the things we don't like about our ADHD or our children's ADHD. It disrupts our lives, makes us work harder, causes turmoil.

But not this week! No, this week we are celebrating Valentine's Day, the day of love. It's time for us to talk about all the things we love about our ADHD. C'mon let's celebrate it!

My ADHD makes me spontaneous and a risk taker. I am up for anything. Therefore I have had more experiences than a lot of people. I have gone on spur of the moment road trips, taken jobs I wasn't necessarily prepared for, jumped from the highest rope swings I could find into the river below - the list goes on and on.

I am super...

ADHD and the Struggle with Relationships

Alone 300x200For many, February is the month of love. We focus on the people we care about and find ways to express our feelings. Perhaps you are in a relationship as an adult with ADHD. Or you are in a relationship with someone who has ADHD. You may even be a parent trying to help your ADHD child with friendships. All of these situations can be very challenging.

Children with attention challenges generally struggle with keeping friends. They are not always able to pick up social cues that allow them to have successful friendships. For instance, your child with ADHD may say something to hurt another childs feelings, but lacks the attention to see the sadness on the other childs face. Therefore your child has no idea he has offended someone. No learning takes place and this behavior continues. Before you know it, your child is coming home complaining that he does not have any friends. And he has no...

The Importance of a BFF

BFF 300x300

Everyone wants to have friends. At an early age, forming friendships allows a child to develop a multitude of skills needed throughout life: teamwork, cooperation, sharing, dealing with conflict, competition, etc.

If your children or clients are struggling with ADHD, they may need your guidance to help develop successful, long-lasting friendships. Here are some tips to help.

* Keep Play Groups Small One or two friends at a time will allow your child to be successful without being overwhelmed.

* Form Friendship Groups  Team Esteem is an organization based out of New York. Run by social workers and psychologists, their goal is to create an environment for children with behavioral, social, and academic challenges. Attitude Magazine says that if your child is having a difficult time forming friendships, a friendship group may be the answer. The article also goes on to caution...

The Importance of Exercise for Brain Health & Attention

Mom Exercise 300x200Everyone knows exercise is great for the body! Its also an activity that the brain loves! 

Exercise stimulates growth factors in the brain which promotes new brain cells which keep the brain operating at peak efficiency. Just walking can boost these levels which regulates the sensation of attention. Exercise should be an essential component of your lifestyle. As a result, you may notice that it is easier to sustain mental focus for extended periods of time.

In an effort to make your workout part of your daily routine, start with something simple. Determine what you believe is the minimum amount of exercise you will deem acceptable, i.e., 15 minutes twice a week, then set a maximum goal, i.e., 30 minutes twice a week. Create a calendar so that you can input your actual exercise and keep notes after each session. You'll see your successes and most likely will not have any trouble...

Set Up Routines

Survey 224x300Time Management
Set Up Routines

When working with a child with ADHD success often comes from setting up routines and sticking to them. It helps establish consistency and expectations. Many times your ADHD child may know what needs to be done, but has a hard time prioritizing the tasks at hand.

It's important to understand that it takes time to set up routines that are consistent. Normally, changes in behaviors take 21 to 30 days before they become habit.

Think about a routine that you tried to establish for yourself. If you were successful, it's probably because you established the routine, executed on it, and were consistent.

So let's just say you're setting up a morning routine for your child. As it stands now, things are chaotic in the morning, always looking for the lost shoe, homework left in the bedroom, teeth rarely brushed, etc. To establish a consistent routine, you may...

Help Me With My Exercise Routine

Every Sunday we post, Memoirs of an ADHD Mom, on our Facebook page. Be certain to read weekly, as Kate shares her real life stories as a mom with ADHD. This week Kate requests your help with a new exercise routine.

Memoirs of an ADHD Mom
Kate wants to lose weight and needs help

Okay folks - this time I'm going to do it. I'm going to get in shape! (And all of you who know me can stop snickering now) I really am. I'm not just turning over a new leaf...I'm turning over a whole new tree.

I am overweight. I compulsively eat. I don't really think of consequences...I just eat whatever looks good at the moment. I really have zero self-control when it comes to food. From what I hear, this is common to adults with ADHD. I also hear exercise is supposed to be good for the ADHD brain, and so..the tree. I'm making a promise to myself to exercise at least an hour a day. I know it's the right thing...