Play Attention in the News

Outside the Head Thinking: A Novel Approach for Detecting Human Brain Cognition

Researcher: Insoo Kim, Samsung Research America, Richardson, TX, USA
We are proud to reveal that our sister company, Freer Logic, who develops BodyWave technology, has been secretly working with the Korean electronics giant, Samsung. Dr. Insoo Kim, head of Samsung Research America, and his colleagues, performed validation studies on BodyWave pitted against a clinical 8 channel EEG device. The tests examined the correlation between attention and relaxation between both instruments. The 8 channel EEG device correlated with a score of 91% using all eight channels. The BodyWave device scored 84% using a single channel on the low forearm away from the brain! Even more significantly, when he 8 channel device was examined channel by channel, it ranged from 84% to 89%; exactly what BodyWave technology scored far away from the brain! The researchers state that, “…our results illustrate the considerable potential of this technology.” pdf(Read more)

The journal Pediatrics (PEDIATRICS Volume 133, Number 3, March 2014)

This peer reviewed journal discusses a six month follow up review of a study performed on Play Attention by the prestigious  Tufts School of Medicine in the Boston Public Schools. Play Attention is termed “Neurofeedback” in the article. The researchers found that, ” Neurofeedback  participants made more prompt and greater improvements in ADHD symptoms, which were sustained at the 6-month follow-up, than did CT participants or those in the control group. This finding suggests that neurofeedback is a promising attention training treatment for children with ADHD.” pdf(Read more)

Journal of Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics – January 2014

This peer reviewed journal article reviews the randomized clinically controlled study of Play Attention completed by Tufts School of Medicine in the Boston Public Schools.  The results are very impressive and validate Play Attention’s efficacy.

Students enrolled were randomly selected to participate in either Play Attention (referred to in study as Neurofeedback or NF); or a computer based cognitive training system (referred to as CT); or no intervention. 

Results:  Parents of children who received Play Attention (NF) training reported significant improvements in attention and executive functioning. Parents of children who received cognitive training (CT) did not report significant improvements compared to those in the control condition.

The parent-reported improvements of participants in the Play Attention (NF) condition on the learning problems subscale might reflect important generalization of skills to the academic setting. It is noteworthy that parents of children in the Play Attention (NF) condition did not seek an increase in their children’s stimulant medication dosage, although these children experienced the same physical growth and increased school demands as their CT and control peers. Stimulant medication dosage in methylphenidate equivalencies significantly increased for children in the CT and control conditions. pdf(Read more)

NASA Spinoff Magazine – 2013

The inspiration for this attention-training game, one of many specialized software programs available under the company’s Play Attention educational product line, began with NASA Langley Research Center scientist Alan Pope’s research in the late 1980s on pilots and automated flight systems. (pdfRead more)

The Press Republican – 06/20/2012

A dolphin slowly descended to the sea floor. It swam past brightly hued aquatic plants and animals.The dolphin’s goal was to collect as many gold coins as possible. The catalyst was Mary Lou Gould’s laser focus on a dolphin icon. With a BodyWave, an iPod-size EEG sensor strapped to her arm, Gould’s concentration, or lack of, was tracked on a laptop. “The first time I came in, I had no idea what it would be like,” Gould said. “It’s amazing. It almost seems like magic. Any of the games will not start unless it has your complete, undivided focus.” North Carolina resident and inventor Peter Freer gifted the BodyWave and laptop to Lake Forest Senior Living Community, where his in-laws reside. (Read more)

Globe and Mail – 11/18/2011

The technology is the brainchild of Peter Freer, a North Carolina elementary-school teacher frustrated by stymied efforts to help students with ADD. It took 11 years and three jobs for him to scrape together enough cash to create a prototype for an educational program called PlayAttention. Mr. Freer was testing the technology on the U.S. bobsled team, with the same focus-boosting aim, when Mr. Templeton cold-called him. Could Mr. Freer whip up something like that for nuclear-plant operators? (Read more)

Huffington Post Canada – 11/17/2011

Its most commonplace use, however, is BodyWave’s ability to help children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Freer formed a company called Play Attention to put this technology to work, designing games and activities that help children see when they’re focusing and when they are not — the games literally will not work unless they put their minds to it. It also is geared toward adults who wants to participate in ‘brain training’ games to assist with concentration and even memory. (Read more)