In the News

Play Attention in the News

The Journal Times – 11/01/2011

Twelve-year-old Nikolas Hufen can control computer games with his mind.  Without touching the mouse or keyboard, Nikolas last Wednesday started a computer game and got objects on the screen to light up.  Nikolas, of Racine, was able to do so because of a portable EEG device strapped to his arm and connected to the computer by Bluetooth. The EEG measured Nikolas’s brain waves and when they showed focus and concentration, the game became active. In some cases his brain waves actually made characters on the screen move. (Read more)

Huffington Post Canada – 11/17/2011

Its most commonplace use, however, is BodyWave’s ability to help children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Freer formed a company called Play Attention to put this technology to work, designing games and activities that help children see when they’re focusing and when they are not — the games literally will not work unless they put their minds to it. It also is geared toward adults who wants to participate in ‘brain training’ games to assist with concentration and even...

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Psychology Today – 07/28/2010

To meet Julian’s short-term attention needs, a physician prescribed medications to help him focus. For his long-term attention needs, we placed him on “Play Attention TM,” a computer-based attention training system that has been educationally proven to help children develop ther ability to focus, and reduce impulvity. We also included learning style training to help him harness his natural style of learning, and parent training to reinforce the behavioral changes we agreed upon. In all, Julian...

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Globe and Mail – 11/18/2011

The technology is the brainchild of Peter Freer, a North Carolina elementary-school teacher frustrated by stymied efforts to help students with ADD. It took 11 years and three jobs for him to scrape together enough cash to create a prototype for an educational program called PlayAttention. Mr. Freer was testing the technology on the U.S. bobsled team, with the same focus-boosting aim, when Mr. Templeton cold-called him. Could Mr. Freer whip up something like that for nuclear-plant operators?...

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Daily Mail – 01/11/2010

The news will infuriate millions of parents who have children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). A new British study has proved that children suffering from the behavioural disorder can control their symptoms – simply by learning self-discipline. Researchers from the University of Hertfordshire’s School of Psychology in Hatfield have been studying the effects of a thought-controlled computer game that requires the player to concentrate in order to win.

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