In the News

Play Attention in the News

Little Rock Family

Andy plays games on a computer without ever touching the keyboard or the mouse. He dons a helmet, and with hands and fingers motionless, he flies a jet over mountain tops or constructs a tower by moving blocks.  Should he fidget or lapse in concentration, he loses control over the characters on the screen. pdf(Read more)

Sun Sentinel

Thanks to Play Attention, Jordan is controlling the impulse, curbing his fidgeting and focusing his attention better these days. “He’s gained more ability to focus on tasks he didn’t want to do,” says his mother, Jeri. “He has skills he can call upon now. He learned coping mechanisms that work for him.” pdf(Read more)

techLearning

“Charles” is a student diagnosed with Autism and is presently in a self-contained classroom for children with Autism. His brother is diagnosed with AD/HD. Charles’ parents were considering Play Attention for his brother and inquired if Charles might benefit from the program. Because of my previous use of Play Attention, I knew it was possible to increase his ability to attend and decrease his impulsive behaviors. pdf(Read more)

techLearning

Parents and teachers commonly encourage children to “pay attention.” But what does pay attention mean? What does it physically feel like? When you instruct a child to pay attention, typically their perception is that they are already paying attention! pdf(Read more)

Woman’s World

Before Play Attention, he couldn’t sit still for more that a few minutes. Now Brody’s free to be the happy little boy he was meant to be….pdf(Read more)