In the News

Play Attention in the News

NASA Spinoff Magazine – 2013

The inspiration for this attention-training game, one of many specialized software programs available under the company’s Play Attention educational product line, began with NASA Langley Research Center scientist Alan Pope’s research in the late 1980s on pilots and automated flight systems. (pdfRead more)

Time Magazine – 11/14/2011

Not long ago, a manager at the Ontario Power Generation (OPG) nuclear plant outside Toronto was completing a routine drill. The manager had to demonstrate that he could accurately instruct a computer to open and close a series of simulated valves–valves crucial to controlling the water and pressure that keep radioactive material contained. But this particular demonstration was unusual, since Lanzanin was operating the valves with his mind. He never touched a keyboard. And when his brain was...

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The Press Republican – 06/20/2012

A dolphin slowly descended to the sea floor. It swam past brightly hued aquatic plants and animals.The dolphin’s goal was to collect as many gold coins as possible. The catalyst was Mary Lou Gould’s laser focus on a dolphin icon. With a BodyWave, an iPod-size EEG sensor strapped to her arm, Gould’s concentration, or lack of, was tracked on a laptop. “The first time I came in, I had no idea what it would be like,” Gould said. “It’s amazing. It almost seems like magic. Any of the games will not...

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Popular Science – January 2011

The system is currently being used to help kids with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and has been adopted as a virtual reality training tool in nuclear power plants. (Read more)

The Journal Times – 11/01/2011

Twelve-year-old Nikolas Hufen can control computer games with his mind.  Without touching the mouse or keyboard, Nikolas last Wednesday started a computer game and got objects on the screen to light up.  Nikolas, of Racine, was able to do so because of a portable EEG device strapped to his arm and connected to the computer by Bluetooth. The EEG measured Nikolas’s brain waves and when they showed focus and concentration, the game became active. In some cases his brain waves actually...

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